Greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

Greenhouse effect | Department of the Environment and Energy

greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

Global warming is one symptom of the much larger problem of dioxide and other greenhouse gases from people burning coal, oil, and gas. The greenhouse effect occurs when Earth's atmosphere traps solar radiation because of the presence of certain gases, which causes. The 'greenhouse effect' is the warming of climate that results when the atmosphere traps heat radiating from Earth toward space. The gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect include water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, nitrous oxides, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

Some of these longer wavelengths are absorbed by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere before they are lost to space. The absorption of this longwave radiant energy warms the atmosphere. These greenhouse gases act like a mirror and reflect back to the Earth some of the heat energy which would otherwise be lost to space. The reflecting back of heat energy by the atmosphere is called the "greenhouse effect".

Explainer: Global warming and the greenhouse effect | Science News for Students

It is not possible to state that a certain gas causes a certain percentage of the greenhouse effect, because the influences of the various gases are not additive.

Other greenhouse gases include, but are not limited to, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons.

greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

Global warming causes by greenhouse effect Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere see above act like a mirror and reflect back to the Earth a part of the heat radiation, which would otherwise be lost to space.

The higher the concentration of green house gases like carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the more heat energy is being reflected back to the Earth.

greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

The emission of carbon dioxide into the environment mainly from burning of fossil fuels oil, gas, petrol, kerosene, etc. Cause for global warming: Carbon dioxide emissions in million tons per year over the last years. Concentration of carbon dioxide has dramatically increased in the last 50 years Source: Products of these fossil fuels, such as gasoline and diesel fuel, power most of the engines that drive cars, airplanes and ships.

By examining air bubbles in ice cores taken from Antarctica, scientists can go back and calculate what the concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have been throughout the lastyears.

Greenhouse effect

The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been climbing to where today it is 30 percent greater thanyears ago. Humans have further increased the levels of greenhouse gases in the air by changing the landscape. Plants take up carbon dioxide to make food in a process called photosynthesis. Once cut down, they can no longer take in carbon dioxide, and this gas begins building up in the air instead of fueling the growth of plants.

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So by cutting down trees and forests for farmland and other human uses, more carbon dioxide is also added into the atmosphere. The changes have resulted from a strengthening of highs to the north of New Zealand, squeezing stronger westerly winds over southern and central New Zealand.

greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

See our media release 'Significant shift in New Zealand climate' Has the climate changed in the past? The Earth's climate has exhibited marked "natural" climate changes, with time scales varying from many millions of years down to a few years. Changes in land and ocean floor topography have had major influences on global climate at time scales of 50 million to million years.

greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

These changes influenced the patterns of absorption of incoming radiation from the sun, and affected circulation patterns in the atmosphere and oceans. Over the last two million years the onset and recession of the great Ice Ages were probably influenced by changes in the earth's orbit and the tilt of its axis, which caused systematic variations in the amount and distribution of solar radiation. Factors influencing these changes probably included fluctuations in the radiation output from the sun, and changes in circulation and overturning in the oceans.

Over periods of a few years, fluctuations in global surface temperatures of a few tenths of a degree are common. View the images on the right for New Zealand's estimated mean yearly temperatures since the last ice age and Mean annual temperatures over New Zealand, from to inclusive.

greenhouse effect and global warming relationship problems

How do we determine past climate? Information about past climate is obtained from piecing evidence together from various sources, including: The ratio of oxygen isotopes in ice indicates the temperature at the time ice was deposited as snow.

Also, air bubbles can be analysed to measure carbon dioxide and methane concentrations at the time the bubbles were trapped in the ice. Different classes of plants produce pollen grains with different distinctive shapes.

Such pollen grains are often found preserved in sediment cores from ponds, lakes and oceans. They provide information on the type of plants that grew nearby when the sediments were formed.

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