Pressure and density relationship liquid conversion

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pressure and density relationship liquid conversion

The pressure exerted by a static fluid depends only upon the depth of the fluid, the density of the fluid, and the acceleration of gravity. The pressure in Pstatic fluid = ρgh where, ρ = m/V = fluid density Fluid column height in the relationship. Pressure within a liquid depends only on the density of the liquid, the acceleration Equation 2 by itself gives the pressure exerted by a liquid relative to atmospheric .. and thus require gauge pressures to be converted to absolute pressures. Water has a higher density in the liquid state than the solid, so ice cubes float. Within a We know that, for gases, the volume is directly proportional to temperature by the equation PV=nRT. The chart at right give the density in kg/ m3.

If we squeeze the balloon, we compress the air and two things will happen: Since density is mass over volume, and the mass stays constant, the rise in density means that the volume of the balloon decreases: For two states of pressure P1, P2 and two corresponding volumes V1, V2this is stated mathematically: This in turn increases the rate at which the gas molecules bombard the skin of the balloon.

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Cooling the balloon down again will make the balloon shrink. For two states with temperatures T1, T2 and two corresponding volumes V1, V2: Because of that, if I have a cubic meter of lead, it will have a lot more mass, and in a gravitational field, weigh a lot more than a cubic meter of marshmallows. Of course, there's always that trick people say, what weighs more-- a pound of feathers, or a pound of lead?

Pressure and Density

Those, obviously, weigh the same-- the key is the volume. A cubic meter of lead is going to weigh a lot more than a cubic meter of feathers. Making sure that we now know what the density is, let's go back to what we were doing before.

pressure and density relationship liquid conversion

We said that the downward force is equal to the mass of the liquid times the gravitational force, and so what is the mass of the liquid? We could use this formula right here-- density is equal to mass times volume, so we could also say that mass is equal to density times volume.

I just multiply both sides of this equation times volume. In this situation, force down is equal to-- let's substitute this with this. The mass of the liquid is equal to the density of the liquid times the volume of the liquid-- I could get rid of these l's-- times gravity.

pressure and density relationship liquid conversion

What's the volume of the liquid? The volume of the liquid is going to be the cross-sectional area of the cylinder times the height. So let's call this cross-sectional area A. A for area-- that's the area of the cylinder or the foil that's floating within the water. We could write down that the downward force is equal to the density of the fluid-- I'll stop writing the l or f, or whatever I was doing there-- times the volume of the liquid.

The volume of the liquid is just the height times the area of the liquid.

pressure and density relationship liquid conversion

So that is just times the height times the area and then times gravity. We've now figured out if we knew the density, this height, the cross-sectional area, and the gravitational constant, we would know the force coming down.

pressure and density relationship liquid conversion

That's kind of vaguely interesting, but let's try to figure out what the pressure is, because that's what started this whole discussion. What is the pressure when you go to deep parts of the ocean? This is the force-- what is the pressure on this foil that I have floating? It's the force divided by the area of pressure on this foil.

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So I would take the force and divide it by the area, which is the same thing as A, so let's do that. Let's divide both sides of this equation by area, so the pressure coming down-- so that's P sub d. Within a particular phase, how does the density depend on temperature? Remember that temperature is related to the average kinetic energy of the atoms or molecules within the substance.

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Pure Water The density of liquid water is approximately 1. Let's look at the density of water at 25 deg C and compare that to a higher temperature, 80 deg C. The density decreases from 0.

This makes sense because, as heat is added to the liquid water, there is greater kinetic energy of the molecules and there are also more vibrations of the water molecules. Together these mean that each H2O unit in liquid water takes up more space as the temperature increases.

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We see the same trend in going from liquid water at 25 deg C 0. Density increase as the temperature decreases. Below 4 deg C, however, the density decreases again.