Raskolnikov and razumikhin relationship counseling

Crime and Punishment - Wikipedia

raskolnikov and razumikhin relationship counseling

Dostoevsky's masterpiece Crime and Punishment, as well as other Dostoevsky . ), Luzhin and the Luzhin storyline center on his marriage .. the vice of homosexuality be eradicated through conversion therapy). Relationships between family members, and the formation of families through In fact, as Raskolnikov withdraws from his family, Razumikhin appears to take. Perhaps the most important relationship in Fyodor Dostoevsky's ''Crime and Punishment'' is that of Rodion Raskolnikov and Sonya Marmeladova. They share a.

Both Jung and Dostoevsky drew on German Romanticism, especially Schelling and Carus, for whom the psychology of the unconscious resonated deeply. I wanted to write about the notion of self in Dostoevsky in order to help in our understanding of the modern self in all its fascinating complexity. I was tantalized by the same questions that seem to tantalize and taunt his characters: What do they believe?

Where is their soul?

raskolnikov and razumikhin relationship counseling

So I began to think to myself, what is the Dostoevskian self? Can we be sure that a single Dostoevskian self exists? There is no monological self in Dostoevsky.

Essay on man and his environment - Man and his environment - IOPscience

The double is the principle of the unconscious mind meeting the conscious mind. It has potential to inhibit self-awareness and cause personal destruction—in characters like Mr. Golyadkin, the Underground Man, or Stavrogin, but also to enhance self-knowledge and achieve self-integration, as Myshkin, Alyosha, or the Ridiculous Man begin to do.

What were your favorite parts of this research? He locates the ideal of brotherhood and transcendent, unifying love, and harmony in the Russian narod—a subject he writes extensively about in Diary of a Writer.

raskolnikov and razumikhin relationship counseling

I always have to laugh when I read it. This interview has been cross-posted on the UT Arlington liberal arts news website.

  • Raskolnikova: Rodion Romanovich’s Struggle with the Woman Within

If you have recently published work on Dostoevsky and would like to be interviewed on our blog, please let us know! Raskolnikov continues establishing connections between his personal emotional state, the experience of the city, the lives that surround him, and the characters with whom he interacts.

These experiences and connections can be imagined not only as the mosaic Anderson describes but also as a web: It is these everyday occurrences that reveal the concerns and personal conflicts Raskolnikov struggles with, of which the dramatic and violent act of murder is only a symptom.

Within this subtext the psychological discussion comes forward since Raskolnikov remains in denial of the associations his mind readily establishes between himself, his misery, and that of others.

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The reader is then able to address individual questions such as the relationship of Raskolnikov to the waifs who reappear in vignettes throughout the novel. The pauses occurring as Raskolnikov invents their histories and speculates their futures argue the significance of these marginal characters.

While Marsh asserts the constant description of the female from the point of view of the external, male gaze, she does not discuss the projection of the male self that this objectification creates 3. I assert however, that this is merely a denial of qualities intrinsic to our humanity—qualities that are not necessarily gender-specific such as empathy or spirituality.

This denial also allows for the female object to be exploited, abused, and dismissed. Throughout the course of the novel it is apparent that Raskolnikov is only able to find himself, or to complete himself through an association with the female characters of this book, be it the anonymous waifs, Sonya, or his sister.

raskolnikov and razumikhin relationship counseling

The harshness of reality is embodied in their labors and suffering, as these women are the reality of the realist novel. Degeneration and the Female Victim [15] The women who fall victim to poverty and find themselves on the street are often either completely disregarded or scorned by passers-by who blame the women for allowing fate to lead them to the streets.

Not surprisingly, the rise of modernity with its subsequent urban overcrowding and increased poverty led to philosophical and scientific investigations of the same. The breakdown on social and cultural levels was thought to cause individual decay, both moral and physical, often leading such to extremes in the individual as madness and even suicide. The reader must then evaluate female condemnation as a matter of context.

Most of the women are represented playing roles, as their lives have been reduced to their assignments accordingly. Necessity has created a space of dichotomous characters who, while pious, are whores, while well-meaning are murderers, and while desperate are ridiculous. His attention is always drawn to female figures on the street, to Dunya, to Sonya, to the likely fate of little Polenka.

Such a repetition of figures and their accompanying histories are not to be read as elements that remain separate from Rodion Romanovich. He is deeply affected by them as indicated by both the pauses taken to describe them and by the various emotionally charged fainting spells that follow each episode. While he is an observer of the city around him, he is also, and more importantly, a part and product of it.

Hunger, delirium and fever do more than just highlight the significance and importance of the body with its functions and needs, but infantilize him. As victim, Raskolnikov relies constantly upon the charity and care-taking of his mother and sister, Nastasha, and even his landlady.

In an almost motherly role, his friend Razumikhin feeds him, dresses him and tries to provide him with opportunities. His sister has accepted a proposal of marriage in order to save herself and their mother from abject poverty. Raskolnikov receives this news with a confused emotional response of anger, hatred, resentment and sadness. When he cries, it is not for their fate, but for his own and at his own failures: Almost all the time that Raskolnikov was reading this letter his face was wet with tears, but when he came to the end it was pale and convulsively distorted and a bitter angry smile played over his lips.

Dostoevsky 33 The confusion of emotions is clear in this passage as he both smiles and cries, is angry and devastated. This letter forces him into a reality he had been in denial of: The history of Dunya and their mother can be reduced to the situation of thousands of women in and around the city trying to earn their keep and failing.

With a good employer, she may have had a more desirable situation than the factory worker, one that shielded her against the shock of urban life. To begin with, she seemed to be very young, no more than a girl, and she was walking through the blazing heat bare-headed and without gloves or parasol, waving her arms about queerly. Her dress was of a thin silken material, but it also looked rather odd; it was not properly fastened, and near the waist at the back, at the top of the skirt, there was a tear, and a great piece of material was hanging loose.

A shawl had been flung round her bare neck and hung crooked and lopsided. He came up with her close to the bench; she went up to it and let herself fall into a corner of it, resting her head against the back and closing her eyes as if overcome with weariness. Looking closely at her, Raskolnikov realized at once that she was quite drunk.

It was a strange, sad sight; he even thought he must be mistaken. Before him he saw the small face of a very young girl, of sixteen, or perhaps only fifteen or so, small, pretty, fair-haired; but the face looked swollen and inflamed. The girl seemed to have little understanding of her surroundings; she crossed one leg over the other, displaying more of it than was seemly, and to all appearances hardly realized that she was in the street.

Dostoevsky This young girl has been seduced and raped. She tried to save herself from the pursuits of her previous employer, Svidrigailov, and instead has found herself agreeing to marriage in order to avoid poverty. The downward spiral that begins with the violation this wandering girl has just survived is not an exclusively female fate; Marmeladov serves as a counterpoint to all of the young women as he too cannot escape the cycle into which he has fallen. The description of her costume suggests the evils of capitalism and its associated impiety.

This costume also foreshadows the religious epiphany to come as Tucker notes its astounding similarity to the description in Revelation This ostentatious costume carries its own message of sin and debauchery, compounding the message of use, abuse, and substitution that its condition implies.

At the genesis of his need to commit his crime however is the need for enough money to get through his studies. She wears clothing inherited from her also anonymous predecessor. Timidly, she explains that he left his address with them last night, and that she has come to invite him to attend her father's funeral. As she leaves, Raskolnikov asks for her address and tells her that he will visit her soon.

At Raskolnikov's behest, Razumikhin takes him to see the detective Porfiry Petrovich, who is investigating the murders. Raskolnikov immediately senses that Porfiry knows that he is the murderer. Porfiry, who has just been discussing the case with Zamyotov, adopts an ironic tone during the conversation. He expresses extreme curiosity about an article that Raskolnikov wrote some months ago called 'On Crime', in which he suggests that certain rare individuals—the benefactors and geniuses of mankind—have a right to 'step across' legal or moral boundaries if those boundaries are an obstruction to the success of their idea.

Raskolnikov defends himself skillfully, but he is alarmed and angered by Porfiry's insinuating tone. An appointment is made for an interview the following morning at the police bureau. Leaving Razumikhin with his mother and sister, Raskolnikov returns to his own building. He is surprized to find an old artisan, who he doesn't know, making inquiries about him. Raskolnikov tries to find out what he wants, but the artisan says only one word — "murderer", and walks off.

Petrified, Raskolnikov returns to his room and falls into thought and then sleep. He wakes to find another complete stranger present, this time a man of aristocratic appearance. The man politely introduces himself as Arkady Ivanovich Svidrigailov. Part 4[ edit ] Svidrigailov indulges in an amiable but disjointed monologue, punctuated by Raskolnikov's terse interjections.

He claims to no longer have any romantic interest in Dunya, but wants to stop her from marrying Luzhin, and offer her ten thousand roubles. Raskolnikov refuses the money on her behalf and refuses to facilitate a meeting. Svidrigailov also mentions that his wife, who defended Dunya at the time of the unpleasantness but died shortly afterwards, has left her rubles in her will.

The meeting with Luzhin that evening begins with talk of Svidrigailov—his depraved character, his presence in Petersburg, the unexpected death of his wife and the rubles left to Dunya. Luzhin takes offence when Dunya insists on resolving the issue with her brother, and when Raskolnikov draws attention to the slander in his letter, he becomes reckless, exposing his true character.

Dunya tells him to leave and never come back. Now free and with significant capital, they excitedly begin to discuss plans for the future, but Raskolnikov suddenly gets up and leaves, telling them, to their great consternation, that it might be the last time he sees them.

Raskolnikov and razumikhin comparison essay

He instructs the baffled Razumikhin to remain and always care for them. He proceeds to Sonya's place. She is gratified that he is visiting her, but also frightened of his strange manner. He asks a series of merciless questions about her terrible situation and that of Katerina Ivanovna and the children. Raskolnikov begins to realize that Sonya is sustained only by her faith in God. She passionately reads to him the story of the raising of Lazarus from the Gospel of John. His fascination with her, which had begun at the time when her father spoke of her, increases and he sees that they must face the future together.

As he leaves he tells her that he will come back tomorrow and tell her who killed her friend Lizaveta. When Raskolnikov presents himself for his interview, Porfiry resumes and intensifies his insinuating, provocative, ironic chatter, without ever making a direct accusation.

With Raskolnikov's anger reaching fever pitch, Porfiry hints that he has a 'little surprise' for him behind the partition in his office, but at that moment there is a commotion outside the door and a young man Mikolka the painter bursts in, followed by some policemen. To both Porfiry and Raskolnikov's astonishment, Mikolka proceeds to loudly confess to the murders. Porfiry doesn't believe the confession, but he is forced to let Raskolnikov go.

Back at his room Raskolnikov is horrified when the old artisan suddenly appears at his door. But the man bows to him and asks for forgiveness: He had been one of those present when Raskolnikov returned to the scene of the murders, and had reported his behavior to Porfiry. Part 5[ edit ] Raskolnikov attends the Marmeladovs' post-funeral banquet at Katerina Ivanovna's apartment. The atmosphere deteriorates as guests become drunk and the half-mad Katerina Ivanovna engages in a verbal attack on her German landlady.

With chaos descending, everyone is surprised by the sudden and portentous appearance of Luzhin. He sternly announces that a ruble banknote disappeared from his apartment at the precise time that he was being visited by Sonya, whom he had invited in order to make a small donation.

Sonya fearfully denies stealing the money, but Luzhin persists in his accusation and demands that someone search her. Outraged, Katerina Ivanovna abuses Luzhin and sets about emptying Sonya's pockets to prove her innocence, but a folded ruble note does indeed fly out of one of the pockets. The mood in the room turns against Sonya, Luzhin chastises her, and the landlady orders the family out. But Luzhin's roommate Lebezyatnikov angrily asserts that he saw Luzhin surreptitiously slip the money into Sonya's pocket as she left, although he had thought at the time that it was a noble act of anonymous charity.

Raskolnikov backs Lebezyatnikov by confidently identifying Luzhin's motive: Luzhin is discredited, but Sonya is traumatized, and she runs out of the apartment. Back at her room, Raskolnikov draws Sonya's attention to the ease with which Luzhin could have ruined her, and consequently the children as well.