JACQUES ATTALI NOISE THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF MUSIC PDF

Listening – Sacrificing – Representing – Repeating – Composing – The politics of silence and sound, by Susan McClary. Noise has ratings and 38 reviews. Ben said: In sum, the history of music should be rewritten as a political effort to channel violence through noise. Argues that music does not reflect society; it foreshadows new social formations. Noise. The Political Economy of Music. •. Author: Jacques Attali.

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Noise: The Political Economy of Music

Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Noise by Jacques Attali. In its general theoretical argument on the relations of culture to economy, but also in its specialized concentration, Noise has much that is of importance to attalii theory today.

PaperbackTheory and History of Literature, Vol 16pages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Noiseplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Jul 13, Ben rated it it was amazing. In sum, the history of music should be rewritten as a political effort to channel violence through noise, which by its nature is unwieldy and acts as a safety valve, to put it too simply. This effort is as old as power.

Specifically, music is said by Attali to have been first created as a way to commit symbolic violence against the other, to preempt the need for ritual murder which in “ancient” societies was the act that identified a scapegoat, an other, thereby giving everyone else a sense of tr In sum, the history of music should be rewritten as a political effort to channel violence through noise, which by its nature is unwieldy and acts as a safety valve, to put it too simply.

Specifically, music is said by Attali to have been first created as a way to commit symbolic violence against the other, to preempt the need for ritual murder which in “ancient” societies was the act that identified a scapegoat, an other, thereby giving everyone else a sense of tribal in-ness. As time politidal on, music became a representation, a mirror of its original purpose whose oolitical was to stand as spectacle.

This period in musicality includes all of concert music and lasts into the 19th or 20th century. Finally, music moved into a period of repetition, where spectacle was no longer possible because everything was always the same.

This was made possible by the advance of capitalism and technology. Attail concerts, in this stage, trailed the mass-produced object in meaning and importance. Finally, there may yet be a final stage in musicality, a stage of composition, where people produce music for their own pleasure, without profit or repetition. Attali’s purpose in tracing this history is economic and prophetic.

By training he is an economist, and he worked as a finance minister under Mitterand. Now he runs a microfinance NGO. Because the production of music requires no labor, humanity can mold it infinitely almost as soon as it imagines some new political possibility. So relations are tthe through music that will eventually come to inform other areas of society, including economics and government.

Thus we can look to music as a foreshadowing, which Attali demonstrates historically. Sep 12, Thorsten rated it it was amazing Shelves: It takes it starting place atop Rene Girard’s theory of memetic desire and the essential violence, showing musics birth and utility in the midsts of time amongst primal society and the ritualised slaughter of a scapegoat.

That seemed a bit hard to sw absolutely genius book tracing the origin and development of music, but so much more – showing music as a reflection of, and a precedent for, the structure of production within society, by focussing on the relationship between music, power and politicak.

That seemed a bit hard to swallow at first but after reading a bit more depth via wikipedia – http: This was reflected in society with the industrial revolution, where labour was also abstracted from ones own form of production and sold as an hourly commodity. The fourth and final stage of the musical production cycle he terms ‘Compositional’. I was keen to see what examples he would give of this stage, but unfortunately the chapter is more open, more of a prediction of what is to come.

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He defines composition as the melding together of production and consumption, in which time and usage are not stockpiled as in repetition nor abstracted such as in representation. In composition, he presents mmusic a strongly optimistic view of society in which each person is personally responsible and powerful, living in the moment and taking pleasure in the act of production.

Interesting to note the book was first published in france inso i’m not sure what effect or level of knowledge he would have had of punk at that point, as he never mentions punk. It can all seem quite prescient, as the idea of a compositional network can easily be imagined as first kusic DIY ethos of punk which fuelled the whole 80s and spread of lo-fi noise bands and music scenes, and as technology moved into the 90s and this present decade, how the widespread adoption and cheap cost of software has enabled mass amounts of young music producers, remixers, djs.

How those same ideas and technology are also shaping society and the structures of power through open source software and open data movements, ideologies of atali government etc. The ecconomy of copyright is also very impressively explained from original guild of copyists who were pissed at the invention of the printing press, so the law came up with the idea of “copy-right” for who could use these new printing press devices.

This was to exonomy money for the composers for their works which were being published in song books and used in mechanical playback machines, but for which the original composers were not being paid. The birth of publishing rights. As another technology breaks the existing order – the phonograph – and the move into the Repetition network stage, the musicians and publishers were upset at not being paid for recordings taken of performances, and from here the need for mechanical copyright arises.

Mar 18, Jamie rated it really liked it Nois Attali goes back as far as the middle ages to show how industrialism and capitalism have attempted to commodify music in the last years, and how legislation has sought to discipline noise, restrict sound, and alienate both musicians and audiences from the cultural labor of creating music.

But he also argues that industry has failed to complete this process, and that society not only has the power to reclaim music and noise-making, but that this reclamation is inevitable.

While this over-archi Attali goes back as far as the middle ages to show how industrialism and capitalism have attempted to commodify music in the last years, and how legislation has sought to discipline noise, restrict sound, and alienate both musicians and audiences from noie cultural labor of creating music.

While this over-arching thesis is compelling, Attali makes other arguments that are far more esoteric that noise is murder and that music is like ritual sacrifice? That bubblegum pop music will destroy the family and eventual result in a sort of Brave New World where children are raised as pop stars from infancy?

Attali is clearly a Marxist, so his rhetoric is somehow both thrilling and boring. He’s also French, and while Massumi’s translation is well-done and readable, it also captures how academic French tends to make everything sound really fascinating, but also really dull.

But even if it’s not the easiest read, Noise and the ideas contained therein are worth the effort, if you can find a copy. Nov 06, Jeremy Hurdis rated it really liked it.

Noise: The Political Economy of Music – Wikipedia

This book will change the way you think about music, unless you’ve already read books similar to this one Adorno, Bataille, Dolar, or Goodman. Thinking about music as a product of labour is important and challenging. Attali provides a very interesting analysis of music as violence related to sacrifice. What is weak in this book is the connection to technology in musical production and reproduction. Even worse, perhaps, is that any discussion mhsic leisure time vs. Regardless, as a a fairly short read this book will provoke thought.

Jan 06, John Levi rated it it was ok Shelves: Atali equates noise to the raw, untamed violence beyond social order. Musical movements like Russolo’ futurism are revolutionary for emancipating noise from the bourgeois romantic musical tradition. But this kind of analysis cannot account for the contemporary “noise” aesthetic common among artists regardless of political leaning.

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The connection between the sonic arts and its inherent politics is not as clear-cut as Atali claims them to be. Dec 09, Jim rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is one of the three books that have changed the way I listen to the world. Attali posits that music is a leading indicator not of the health of the political economy, but the very structure of it.

Outline summary of Jacques Attali Noise

And as a bonus, it’s not nearly as obtuse as most contemporary French philosophy. Aug 11, Sol Rezza rated it it was amazing.

Libro imprescindible para todos aquellos interesados en el sonido. Nov 13, Amy Conrad rated it it was amazing. I love this book. I have used it to enhance my reading of many texts, both fiction and non-fiction. Aug 30, Michael rated it it was ok. As an investigation into the fetishization of music and the regression of listening, Noise: The Political Economy of Music manages to fail in interesting ways.

Attali attempts to provide a historical investigation into the development of music from its origins in ritual through to the development of modern recording. To achieve this, he draws on an approach heavily influenced by Theodor Adorno and Critical Theory. The result is at times brilliant as it traces the economics of nineteenth and twen As an investigation into the fetishization of music and the regression of listening, Noise: The result is at times brilliant as it traces the economics of nineteenth and twentieth century music production and reception and frustrating in its overly broad and oftentimes unsubstantiated claims of the ur-history of music prior to the age of capitalism.

The failure of the book rests on three factors, each in its own way undermining the whole of the thesis. First, as a materialist history of music, the book takes in a much too broad aesthetic category over a too large period of time.

In the nineteenth century alone, the divergent musical forms distributed over both high and low cultures would require a tome of considerable length, but Attali glosses over this and not only includes the one century but the entire history of music.

As a consequence, we end up with the second factor undermining the book, a series of unsubstantiated generalizations such as music is ritualized human sacrifice. Finally, because the theory relies so heavily on Adorno, Attali fails to give sufficient consideration to the liberationist elements within music, so that musical innovation can only be reducible to market demand and exploitation. There is no dialectic of technological repetition.

To this end, the book could use a little Walter Benjamin and the revolutionary potential of Technological Reproducibility.

At the same time, though the book fails, it does fail in interesting ways.

When Attali is focused on the political economy of nineteenth and twentieth century music, he does offer fresh insight into the economic exploitation of music. In these discussion, Attali is at his best as he provides descriptions of how musical forms were developed or marginalized depending upon the markets and the technologies of different eras.

The history of the relationship between music, technology and capitalist economics, essentially the process whereby music production became a monetized activity, are revealing and instructive for understanding musical history. Frustratingly, here where he is most interesting, Attali is also uninterested in providing a greater degree of depth because his theory of music as murder interferes with the much richer materialist dialectic between music and capitalism.

For a person interested in this general area of music theory, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock and Roll offers a much more interesting take on the relationship between technology, economy and music, one that is stronger because of its more narrow focus on twentieth century popular music in America. Noiss 02, Chris and Yuri rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: The idea that music is a manifestation of political power is probably disgusting to most people.

But there is off reason we call people like Haydn “court” composers: