Dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

Quote by Coco Chanel: “Dress like you are going to meet your worst ene”

dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

Coco Chanel's quotes on life and fashion are as timeless as her clothes, or, as she put it: "Fashion “Dress like you are going to meet your worst enemy today.”. From the boardroom to your best friends, you're all about women empowering women. But how much do you have your own back?. Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth. But what we've got going wrong is we've got a kind of bifurcation [in cultural development]: When I meet you, I see not just what you define yourself as—Mr so-and- so, Ms .. we speak of the brain, or the nervous system, as "governing" the heart or the digestive.

If the policeman on his beat finds you asleep, it is his duty to wake you up. That is because it has been found that a sleeping man succumbs to the cold more easily than a man who is awake, and England could not let one of her sons die in the street.

So you are at liberty to spend the night in the street, providing it is a sleepless night. But there is one road where the homeless are allowed to sleep. Strangely, it is the Thames Embankmentnot far from the Houses of Parliament.

We advise all those visitors to England who would like to see the reverse side of our apparent prosperity to go and look at those who habitually sleep on the Embankment, with their filthy tattered clothes, their bodies wasted by disease, a living reprimand to the Parliament in whose shadow they lie.

But below a certain income the petty crowds the large out of existence; one's preoccupation is not with art or religionbut with bad foodhard beds, drudgery and the sack.

Serenity is impossible to a poor man in a cold country and even his active thoughts will go in more or less sterile complaint. Henry called the stern and rugged fear of the police to a point where any public protest seems an indecency.

The highly socialised modern mind, which makes a kind of composite god out of the rich, the government, the police and the larger newspapers, has not been developed — at least not yet. Review of Tropic of Cancerin New English Weekly 14 November Think of life as it really is, think of the details of life; and then think that there is no meaning in it, no purpose, no goal except the grave.

Surely only fools or self-deceivers, or those whose lives are exceptionally fortunate, can face that thought without flinching? A Clergyman's DaughterCh. Like faith, it is ultimately not rooted in logic; it is a change in the climate of the mind. A Clergyman's Daughter, Ch. Perhaps the fundamental difference is that beneath a tropical sun individuality seems less distinct and the loss of it less important.

dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

Review of Indian Mosaic by Mark Channing, in The Listener 15 July I am struck again by the fact that as soon as a working man gets an official post in the Trade Union or goes into Labour politics, he becomes middle-class whether he will or no. The fact is that you cannot help living in the manner appropriate and developing the ideology appropriate to your income.

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  • Alan Watts

The Road to Wigan Pier Diary February In addition to this there is the horrible — the really disquieting — prevalence of cranks wherever Socialists are gathered together. One sometimes gets the impression that the mere words ' Socialism ' and ' Communism ' draw towards them with magnetic force every fruit-juice drinker, nudist, sandal-wearer, sex-maniac, Quaker'Nature Cure' quack, pacifist, and feminist in England.

The Road to Wigan Pier - Full text online War against a foreign country only happens when the moneyed classes think they are going to profit from it.

Every war, when it comes, or before it comes, is represented not as a war but as an act of self-defence against a homicidal maniac. The essential job is to get people to recognise war propaganda when they see it, especially when it is disguised as peace propaganda. It is not merely that at present the rule of naked force obtains almost everywhere. Probably that has always been the case. Where this age differs from those immediately preceding it is that a liberal intelligentsia is lacking.

Bully-worship, under various disguises, has become a universal religionand such truisms as that a machine- gun is still a machine-gun even when a "good" man is squeezing the trigger — and that in effect is what Mr Russell is saying — have turned into heresies which it is actually becoming dangerous to utter.

Sometimes the first duty of intelligent men is the restatement of the obvious. Acceptance of the Catholic position implies a certain willingness to see the present injustices of society continue Individual salvation implies liberty, which is always extended by Catholic writers to include the right to private property. But in the stage of industrial development which we have now reached, the right to private property means the right to exploit and torture millions of one's fellow creatures.

The Socialist would argue, therefore, that one can only defend property if one is more or less indifferent to economic justice. Review of Communism and Man by F.

Sheed in Peace News 27 January The past is a curious thing. It's with you all the time. I suppose an hour never passes without your thinking of things that happened ten or twenty years ago, and yet most of the time it's got no reality, it's just a set of facts that you've learned, like a lot of stuff in a history book. Then some chance sight or sound or smell, especially smell, sets you going, and the past doesn't merely come back to you, you're actually in the past.

Coming Up for Air, Part 3, Ch. Inside the Whale [1] Men are only as good as their technical development allows them to be. The class Dickens belonged to, at least by adoption, was growing suddenly rich after a couple of centuries of obscurity. It had grown up mainly in the big towns, out of contact with agriculture, and politically impotent; government, in its experience, was something which either interfered or persecuted.

Consequently it was a class with no tradition of public service and not much tradition of usefulness. What now strikes us as remarkable about the new moneyed class of the nineteenth century is their complete irresponsibility; they see everything in terms of individual success, with hardly any consciousness that the community exists.

He is always preaching a sermon, and that is the final secret of his inventiveness. For you can only create if you can care. Types like Squeers and Micawber could not have been produced by a hack writer looking for something to be funny about.

A joke worth laughing at always has an idea behind it, and usually a subversive idea. Dickens is able to go on being funny because he is in revolt against authority, and authority is always there to be laughed at. It is not necessarily the actual face of the writer.

I feel this very strongly with Swiftwith Defoewith FieldingStendhalThackerayFlaubertthough in several cases I do not know what these people looked like and do not want to know.

dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

What one sees is the face that the writer ought to have. Well, in the case of Dickens I see a face that is not quite the face of Dickens's photographs, though it resembles it.

It is the face of a man of about forty, with a small beard and a high colour. Hence the utter lack of any constructive suggestion anywhere in his work.

He attacks the law, parliamentary government, the educational system and so forth, without ever clearly suggesting what he would put in their places.

Of course it is not necessarily the business of a novelist, or a satirist, to make constructive suggestions, but the point is that Dickens's attitude is at bottom not even destructive.

There is no clear sign that he wants the existing order to be overthrown, or that he believes it would make very much difference if it were overthrown. It would be difficult to point anywhere in his books to a passage suggesting that the economic system is wrong as a system. All art is propaganda. Neither Dickens himself nor the majority of Victorian novelists would have thought of denying this.

On the other hand, not all propaganda is art. As I said earlier, Dickens is one of those writers who are felt to be worth stealing. He has been stolen by Marxists, by Catholics and, above all, by Conservatives. The question is, What is there to steal? Why does anyone care about Dickens? Why do I care about Dickens? Of the things you have, select the best and then reflect how eagerly you would have sought them if you did not have them.

Petit Senn "To be content means that you realize you contain what you seek. Then your time on earth will be filled with glory. You can't keep blaming somebody else for your dysfunction. Life is really about moving on. Barr "View your life from your funeral: Looking back at your life experiences, what have you accomplished? What would you have wanted to accomplish but didn't? What were the happy moments? What were the sad? What would you do again, and what wouldn't you do?

The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. Stevenson II "Our chief want is someone who will inspire us to be what we know we could be.

He is the one that gets people to do the greatest things. Do your thing, and don't care if they like it. A leader isn't someone who forces others to make him stronger; a leader is someone willing to give his strength to others that they may have the strength to stand on their own.

The first is gentleness; the second is frugality; the third is humility, which keeps me from putting myself before others. Be gentle and you can be bold; be frugal and you can be liberal; avoid putting yourself before others and you can become a leader among men. Eisenhower "Victory has a hundred fathers and defeat is an orphan. Kennedy "Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things. Drucker "You are not here merely to make a living.

You are here in order to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget the errand.

It is the only thing.

“Dress like you are going to meet your worst enemy today.”

Maxwell "The mark of a great man is one who knows when to set aside the important things in order to accomplish the vital ones. It is about one life influencing another. Maxwell "You have to be burning with an idea, or a problem, or a wrong that you want to right. If you're not passionate enough from the start, you'll never stick it out. He stays behind the flock, letting the most nimble go out ahead, whereupon the others follow, not realizing that all along they are being directed from behind.

People look to me to do things for them, to have answers.

Meet Your Master: Getting to Know Your Brain - Crash Course Psychology #4

But do not care to convince him. Men will believe what they see. Lee "The day the soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help them or concluded that you do not care.

Either case is a failure of leadership. What great cause would have been fought and won under the banner: A great leader takes people where they don't necessarily want to go but ought to be. Both are based on authority.

A boss demands blind obedience; a leader earns his authority through understanding and trust. Solomon "In the end, it is important to remember that we cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.

I believe a bit of the reason is to throw little torches out to lead people through the dark. Whether it's cattle, or horses, or men, the least government is the best government. It is very easy to say yes. You have to not only know what to do and when to do it, but you have to also be brave enough to follow through. No, the idea that wins is the one with the most fearless heretic behind it. And the only way to do that is to overcome our need for invulnerability. Try to please everybody.

Morgan "If you spend your life trying to be good at everything, you will never be great at anything. Agu "Whenever you see a successful business, someone once made a courageous decision.

Drucker "When you put together deep knowledge about a subject that intensely matters to you, charisma happens. You gain courage to share your passion, and when you do that, folks follow. A great leader leads the people from within them. Arnold "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

You can't blow an uncertain trumpet. Hesburgh "It is absolutely necessary You lead by going to that place and making a case.

My job is to take these great people we have and to push them and make them even better. Chesterton "'Enough' is a feast. Kennedy "Acknowledging the good that you already have in your life is the foundation for all abundance. Clark "If you want to turn your life around, try thankfulness. It will change your life mightily. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos into order, confusion into clarity It has enough lush forests, flowered fields, and sandy beaches.

It has plenty of stars and the promise of a new sunrise and sunset every day. What the world needs more of is people to appreciate and enjoy it. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us. If you concentrate on what you don't have, you will never, ever have enough.

Gratitude is the completion of thankfulness. Thankfulness may consist merely of words. To manifest individuality, every branch must have a sensitive connection with the tree, just as our independently moving and differentiated fingers must have a sensitive connection with the whole body. The point, which can hardly be repeated too often, is that differentiation is not separation. The head and the feet are different, but not separate, and though man is not connected to the universe by exactly the same physical relation as branch to tree or feet to head, he is nonetheless connected—and by physical relations of fascinating complexity.

The death of the individual is not disconnection but simply withdrawal. The corpse is like a footprint or an echo—the dissolving trace of something which the Self has ceased to do. It is all part of the illusion that there should seem to be something to be gained in the future, and that there is an urgent necessity to go on and on until we get it.

Yet just as there is no time but the present, and no one except the all-and-everything, there is never anything to be gained—though the zest of the game is to pretend that there is. It may charm you into crying, force you to dance, fill you with rage, or make you jump for joy.

You can't tell where the music ends and the emotions begin, for the whole thing is a kind of music—the voice playing on your nerves as the breath plays on a flute. All experience is just that, except that its music has many more dimensions than sound. It vibrates in the dimensions of sight, touch, taste, and smell, and in the intellectual dimension of symbols and words—all evoking and playing upon each other. Of what use is the universe?

What is the practical application of a million galaxies? Yet just because it has no use, it has a use—which may sound like a paradox, but is not. What, for instance, is the use of playing music? If you play to make money, to outdo some other artist, to be a person of culture, or to improve your mind, you are not really playing—for your mind is not on the music.

When you come to think of it, playing or listening to music is a pure luxury, an addiction, a waste of valuable time and money for nothing more than making elaborate patterns of sound.

From this point of view the universe in general and playing in particular are, in a special sense, "meaningless": We supposed that solids were one thing and space quite another, or just nothing whatever. Then it appeared that space was no mere nothing, because solids couldn't do without it. But the mistake in the beginning was to think of solids and space as two different things, instead of as two aspects of the same thing. The point is that they are different but inseparable, like the front end and the rear end of a cat.

Cut them apart, and the cat dies. Take away the crest of the wave, and there is no trough. Here is someone who has never seen a cat. He is looking through a narrow slit in a fence, and, on the other side, a cat walks by.

He sees first the head, then the less distinctly shaped furry trunk, and then the tail. The cat turns round and walks back, and again he sees the head, and a little later the tail.

This sequence begins to look like something regular and reliable. Yet again, the cat turns round, and he witnesses the same regular sequence: Thereupon he reasons that the event head is the invariable and necessary cause of the event tail, which is the head's effect.

This absurd and confusing gobbledygook comes from his failure to see that head and tail go together: The cat wasn't born as a head which, sometime later, caused a tail; it was born all of a piece, a head-tailed cat.

Alan Watts - Wikiquote

Our observer's trouble was that he was watching it through a narrow slit, and couldn't see the whole cat at once.

Lifting the neck of a bottle implies lifting the bottom as well, for the "two parts" come up at the same time. If I pick up an accordion by one end, the other will follow a little later, but the principle is the same.

Total situations are, therefore, patterns in time as much as patterns in space. Look at my watch, which tells the time; it goes round, and so the world repeats itself again and again.

But just as the hour-hand of the watch goes up to twelve and down to six, so, too, there is day and night, waking and sleeping, living and dying, summer and winter.

You can't have any one of these without the other, because you wouldn't be able to know what black is unless you had seen it side-by-side with white, or white unless side-by-side with black. Teenagers sometimes know more about it than adults. Taboos lie within taboos, like the skin of an onion.

Inside Information Wonder is not a disease. Wonder, and its expression in poetry and the artsare among the most important things which seem to distinguish men from other animalsand intelligent and sensitive people from morons. Nor will it do to confront the opposition in public with polite and nonviolent sit-ins and demonstrations, while boosting our collective ego by insulting them in private.

If we want justice for minorities and cooled wars with our natural enemies, whether human or non-human, we must first come to terms with the minority and the enemy in ourselves and in our own hearts, for the rascal is there as much as anywhere in the "external" world—-especially when you realize that the world outside your skin is as much yourself as the world inside. For want of this awareness, no one can be more belligerent than a pacifist on the rampage, or more militantly nationalistic than an anti-imperialist.

As the ocean "waves," the universe "peoples. This fact is rarely, if ever, experienced by most individuals. Even those who know it to be true in theory do not sense or feel it, but continue to be aware of themselves as isolated "egos" inside bags of skin. Inside Information If I first see a tree in the winter, I might assume that it is not a fruit-tree. But when I return in the summer to find it covered with plums, I must exclaim, 'Excuse me!

You were a fruit-tree after all. They would dismiss it as 'Just a bunch of old rocks! The fruit-tree was at one time a seed inside a plum, but the earth - much less the solar system or the galaxy - was never a seed inside a person. But, oddly enough, you would be wrong.

Inside Information I seem to be a brief light that flashes but once in all the aeons of time — a rare, complicated, and all-too-delicate organism on the fringe of biological evolutionwhere the wave of life bursts into individual, sparkling, and multicolored drops that gleam for a moment The history and the geographical distribution of the myth are uncertain, but for several thousand years we have been obsessed with a false humility—on the one hand, putting ourselves down as mere "creatures" who came into this world by the whim of God or the fluke of blind forces, and on the other, conceiving ourselves as separate personal egos fighting to control the physical world.

We have lacked the real humility of recognizing that we are members of the biosphere, the "harmony of contained conflicts" in which we cannot exist at all without the cooperation of plants, insects, fish, cattle, and bacteria.

In the same measure, we have lacked the proper self-respect of recognizing that I, the individual organism, am a structure of such fabulous ingenuity that it calls the whole universe into being. In the act of putting everything at a distance so as to describe and control it, we have orphaned ourselves both from the surrounding world and from our own bodies—leaving "I" as a discontented and alienated spook, anxious, guilty, unrelated, and alone.

dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

But the problem then is that it is impossible for us to conceive an image higher than the human image. Few of us have ever met an angel, and probably would not recognize it if we saw one, and our images of an impersonal or suprapersonal God are hopelessly subhuman—jello, featureless light, homogenized space, or a whopping jolt of electricity.

However, our image of man is changing as it becomes clearer and clearer that the human being is notsimply and only his physical organism. My body is also my total environment, and this must be measured by light-years in the billions. Hitherto the poets and philosophers of science have used the vast expanse and duration of the universe as a pretext for reflections on the unimportance of man, forgetting that man with "that enchanted loom, the brain" is precisely what transforms this immense electrical pulsation into light and color, shape and sound, large and small, hard and heavy, long and short.

In knowing the world we humanize it, and if, as we discover it, we are astonished at its dimensions and its complexity, we should be just as astonished that we have the brains to perceive it. This definition is miserably insufficient, for in fact we know how to grow brains and eyes, ears and fingers, hearts and bones, in just the same way that we know how to walk and breathe, talk and think—only we can't put it into words.

Words are too slow and too clumsy for describing such things, and conscious attention is too narrow for keeping track of all their details. I replied that no considerate God would destroy the human mind by making it so rigid and unadaptable as to depend upon one book, the Bible, for all the answers. For the use of words, and thus of a book, is to point beyond themselves to a world of life and experience that is not mere words or even ideas.

Just as money is not real, consumable wealth, books are not life. To idolize scriptures is like eating paper currency.

20 Amazing Coco Chanel Quotes on Life, Fashion, and True Style | StyleCaster

All you men think about is bodies. OK, so I'm beautiful, but I got my body from my parents and it was just luck. I prefer to be admired for myself, not my chassis. All she is saying is that she has lost touch with her own astonishing wisdom and ingenuity, and wants to be admired for some trivial tricks that she can perform with her conscious attention.

And we are all in the same situation, having dissociated ourselves from our bodies and from the whole network of forces in which bodies can come to birth and live.

For one reason, the home in an industrial society is chiefly a dormitory, and the father does not work there, with the result that wife and children have no part in his vocation. He is just a character who brings in money, and after working hours he is supposed to forget about his job and have fun. Novels, magazines, television, and popular cartoons therefore portray "Dad" as an incompetent clown.

dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

And the image has some truth in it because Dad has fallen for the hoax that work is simply something you do to make money, and with money you can get anything you want. It is no wonder that an increasing proportion of college students want no part in Dad's world, and will do anything to avoid the rat-race of the salesman, commuter, clerk, and corporate executive. Professional men, too—architects, doctors, lawyers, ministers, and professors—have offices away from home, and thus, because the demands of their families boil down more and more to money, are ever more tempted to regard even professional vocations as ways of making money.

All this is further aggravated by the fact that parents no longer educate their own children. Thus the child does not grow up with understanding of or enthusiasm for his father's work. Instead, he is sent to an understaffed school run mostly by women which, under the circumstances, can do no more than hand out mass-produced education which prepares the child for everything and nothing.

It has no relation whatever to his father's vocation. Jewelry is slick and uninteresting. Architecture is almost totally bereft of exuberance, obsessed with erecting glass boxes. Children's books are written by serious ladies with three names and no imagination, and as for comics, have you ever looked at the furniture in Dagwood's home? The potentially magical ceremonies of the Catholic Church are either gabbled away at top speed, or rationalized with the aid of a commentator.

Drama or ritual in everyday behavior is considered affectation and bad form, and manners have become indistinguishable from manerisms—where they exist at all.

dress like youre gonna meet your worst enemy was own nervous system

We produce nothing comparable to the great Oriental carpets, Persian glass, tiles, and illuminated books, Arabian leatherwork, Spanish marquetry, Hindu textiles, Chinese porcelain and embroidery, Japanese lacquer and brocade, French tapestries, or Inca jewelry. Though, incidentally, there are certain rather small electronic devices that come unwittingly close to fine jewels. The reason is not just that we are too much in a hurry and have no sense of the present; not just that we cannot afford the type of labor that such things would now involve, nor just that we prefer money to materials.

The reason is that we have scrubbed the world clean of magic. We have lost even the vision of paradise, so that our artists and craftsmen can no longer discern its forms. This is the price that must be paid for attempting to control the world from the standpoint of an "I" for whom everything that can be experienced is a foreign object and a nothing-but.

The child is tricked into the ego-feeling by the attitudes, words, and actions of the society which surrounds him—his parents, relatives, teachers, and, above all, his similarly hoodwinked peers. Other people teach us who we are. Their attitudes to us are the mirror in which we learn to see ourselves, but the mirror is distorted. We are, perhaps, rather dimly aware of the immense power of our social environment. We seldom realize, for example, that our most private thoughts and emotions are not actually our own.

For we think in terms of languages and images which we did not invent, but which were given to us by our society. We copy emotional reactions from our parents, learning from them that excrement is supposed to have a disgusting smell and that vomiting is supposed to be an unpleasant sensation. The dread of death is also learned from their anxieties about sickness and from their attitudes to funerals and corpses.

Our social environment has this power just because we do not exist apart from a society. Society is our extended mind and body. All of them might be dismissed as nonsense-noises if the notion of an underlying Ground of Being were no more than a product of intellectual speculation.

But these names are often used to designate the content of a vivid and almost sensorily concrete experience—the "unitive" experience of the mystic, which, with secondary variations, is found in almost all cultures at all times.

This experience is the transformed sense of self which I was discussing in the previous chapter, though in "naturalistic" terms, purified of all hocus-pocus about mind, soul, spirit, and other intellectually gaseous words. This, rather than any miasmic absorption of differences into acontinuum of ultimate goo, is the metaphysical unity underlying the world. For this unity is not mere one-ness as opposed to multiplicity, since these two terms are themselves polar.

The unity, or inseparability, of one and many is therefore referred to in Vedanta philosophy as "nonduality" advaita to distinguish it from simple uniformity.

If you go to concerts to "get culture" or to improve your mind, you will sit there as deaf as a doorpost. I do this in the same way that some birds are eagles and some doves, some flowers lilies and some roses. As soon as they are forced they acquire that unnatural, contrived, and phony atmosphere which everyone deplores—weak and scentless like forced flowers and tasteless like forced fruit. Life and love generate effort, but effort will not generate them.